Walker Convicted Of Rape – August 30, 2011

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

The creepy clearing between the freeway and Community Park softball field where Jane Doe was raped. KLH | Eye

Kevin L. Hoover

Eye Editor

HUMBOLDT – Kevin Scott Walker was found guilty of two forms of sexual assault last week.

A seven-woman, five-man jury found Walker, 38, of Eureka, guilty of forcible rape while acting in concert and forced oral copulation while acting in concert following a July 5, 2010 attack on a 20-year-old woman in the wooded area between the Community Park softball field and U.S. Highway 101.

The woman stumbled out of the wooded area and asked nearby softball players for help. Witnesses said that around her mouth was a still-fresh red handprint from where she had been restrained and kept from screaming as she was assaulted.

Police were called while the ball players went over to the wooded area and immediately located Walker. Police soon arrived and arrested Walker.

On being led to an ambulance, witness Richard Marks said that “he started spitting on the EMT and pissing all over. He started yelling, ‘Don’t you know who my father is? He is going to kill you!’ Then he started chanting loudly, ‘Beelzebub, Beelzebub, Beelzebub, Beelzebub!’”

According to the Times-Standard, Walker was involved in another case of alleged sexual assault in 2008 involving sodomy during an assault with a metal pipe on a man in Trinidad. He later pleaded guilty to the assault charge.

In the Arcata incident, prosecutors said Walker had met victim Jane Doe on the Plaza and arranged to rendezvous with another man in the wooded area to smoke cannabis. But once there, he assaulted her.

Kevin Scott Walker

Walker’s defense had contended that the sex was consensual.

Walker is facing a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison. His sentencing is set for Sept. 21. Regardless, he will have to register as a sex offender for the rest of his life.

Police Chief Tom Chapman was extremely gratified at the trial outcome. “Walker is a bad guy,” Chapman said. “I truly believe he is a predator and there’s one place for him – in prison.”

He sympathized with Jane Doe, who had to endure painful cross-examination. “Kudos to the victim, who had the courage to testify under some pretty intense cross examination,” Chapman said.

He heaped praise on all those who helped build the case – the citizens who aided the woman following the assault, the officers who investigated it and the District Attorney’s Office for following through and securing a conviction.

“I’m proud of the investigation our officers conducted,” Chapman said. “Also, I appreciate the DA’s efforts in making sure that justice was served. It was a difficult case with difficult witnesses, but they were relentless and went forward when it would have been understandable if they hadn’t. I’ve got to hand it to [Deputy DA] Ben McLaughlin – he did an outstanding job.”

Softball enthusiast Richard Marks, who assisted the victim the night of the attack, was also happy with the verdict.

“I’m just glad that he’s put away for a while,” Marks said. He’s still somewhat rattled by the incident. “It was totally, absolutely bizarre,” he said.

18 years for Cardelli

In other sexual assault conviction news, former Calvary Chapel pastor Dino Cardelli was sentenced to 18 years in prison for serial sexual abuse of a girl whom he had adopted.

He pleaded guilty June 22 to charges of continued sexual abuse of a minor, child molestation, attempting to dissuade a witness and 25 counts of violating a court order forbidding contact with the victim. The sentence was the maximum allowed.

Chapman said Cardelli betrayed the trust inherent in his position, calling it “the most egregious conduct for a person in a position of trust.”

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6 Responses to “Walker Convicted Of Rape – August 30, 2011”

  1. Mark Sailors

    I think that there are too many sexual assaults per capita in this area.

    I think the numbers are like 7 reported rapes last year. This is unacceptable.

    I am looking for a location to open a dojo somewhere in the downtown area.

    We will be offering free women’s self defense classes every semester.

    If anyone knows of an affordable location downtown…feel free to get in touch.
    Thanks.

    #35353
  2. Danni

    A DoJo? Sounds like the Goat wants the keys to the oats bin in the barn, When he’s supposed to be out in the field eating those Himalayan berry brambles that are trying to take over the blackberry bushes.

    Ladies, you should behave as if you are swimming in the ocean or the rivers, buddy up when you go out.

    And what does your Mom say? Don’t talk to strangers.

    Somebody grabs you poke him hard in the eye with a Bic Ballpoint pen or a stick or your nails or your keys throw dirt in the eyes, for starters, scream like a crazy woman, and bite, tear and hit, you fight for YOUR life not the A-Hole who is going to hurt you.

    #35597
  3. Danni

    Don’t you ladies pride yourselves on ability to read, learn and apply things learned in your world? I think you do. Isn’t HSU a Teaching school that teaches teachers to be teachers?

    This should get you started…

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strike_%28attack%29

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pressure_point

    http://www.ehow.com/how_5704442_strike-pressure-point-nerve-cluster.html

    Top 5 To Try

    *
    The Pon Techniques for Tai Chi
    *
    How to Use Pressure Points for Self Defense
    *
    The Pressure Points Used in Self Defense Techniques
    *
    Pressure Point Striking Techniques
    *
    How to Learn Pressure Points Online

    How to Strike to a Pressure Point & Nerve Cluster
    X

    Pressure points are one of the most widely misunderstood concepts in martial arts. Many different legends have been repeated over the years regarding secretive and lethal techniques. There is nothing mystical or magical about the existence of pressure points or their application in self-defense. Pressure points are nerve clusters, frequently around major muscle groups, that when struck or grabbed can cause the nearby muscle groups to spasm in a painful manner. While there are many different ways of getting to them in a self-defense situation, there are a few steps to make it easier to find them when you need to.

    Difficulty:
    Moderate

    Instructions
    Things You’ll Need

    * Mirror
    * Training partner

    1.
    Pressure Point Strikes
    * 1

    Locate each pressure point. There are many different nerve clusters throughout the body. Start with the soft tissue directly under the chin, the muscles right at the base of the neck near the top of the shoulder, the nerve clusters in the very front of the shoulder next to the pectoral muscles, and the solar plexus at the base of the breastbone.
    * 2

    Practice using a mirror. Take two fingers and lightly press against each of these areas until you can locate them comfortably. You’ll know you’ve located the right spot because each location is extremely sensitive to pushing or impact pressure.
    * 3

    Make a fist with one hand. Bend the middle knuckle of your pointer finger out so it protrudes from the front of the fist with the thumb bracing it underneath. This will be used for practicing knuckle strikes. You then drive the point of the knuckle into the targeted pressure point.
    * 4

    Decide how to strike. Most strikes can be done with a regular fist but some pressure points are small enough that a knuckle strike is more effective in hitting the appropriate nerve areas. When training or sparring from a close distance, use the knuckle strike to jab into the clusters that you found in the mirror. When using a sparring partner, be very careful because a hard strike to these areas is very painful and can be disabling.
    * 5

    Practice in a mirror throwing these types of strikes at short range. Don’t use knuckle strikes from a long distance because they are only effective on soft-tissue areas of the body. If you miss and strike a hard surface like the skull or the breastbone, you are likely to break a finger. From longer distances, use a regular fist.

    Tips & Warnings

    *

    Training partners are very useful in practicing these techniques since a heavy bag is frequently impractical for pressure-point drills. Find someone else who has sparring experience in a martial-arts environment who can assist you in practicing the targets and technique.
    *

    Be very careful whenever locating pressure points on yourself or on your partner. They can cause extreme pain and injury. Use caution when practicing strikes to not injure a training partner or yourself.

    #35598
  4. B

    North Coast Aikido is already on the plaza, with classes 6 days a week. Anyone interested in self-defense skills, aside from the well-summarized posts by Danni, should check them out.

    #35732
  5. Mark Sailors

    Aikido, in its purest form has no offense. It is purely defensive. Aikido is Daitoryu Aikijujutsu with all of the offense removed.

    “Aikido (合気道 Aikidō?) is a Japanese martial art developed by Morihei Ueshiba as a synthesis of his martial studies, philosophy, and religious beliefs. Aikido is often translated as “the Way of unifying (with) life energy” or as “the Way of harmonious spirit.” Ueshiba’s goal was to create an art that practitioners could use to defend themselves while also protecting their attacker from injury.

    Aikido is performed by blending with the motion of the attacker and redirecting the force of the attack rather than opposing it head-on. This requires very little physical strength, as the aikidōka (aikido practitioner) “leads” the attacker’s momentum using entering and turning movements. The techniques are completed with various throws or joint locks.

    Aikido derives mainly from the martial art of Daitō-ryū Aiki-jūjutsu, but began to diverge from it in the late 1920s, partly due to Ueshiba’s involvement with the Ōmoto-kyō religion. Ueshiba’s early students’ documents bear the term aiki-jūjutsu.

    Ueshiba’s senior students have different approaches to aikido, depending on when they studied with him. Today aikido is found all over the world in a number of styles, with broad ranges of interpretation and emphasis. However, they all share techniques learned from Ueshiba and most have concern for the well-being of the attacker.”

    I have NO concern for the well being of an attacker, especially a rapist.

    #35750
  6. Ian Ray

    Flicking fingernails into the eyes is good close combat.

    Biting works best when locking down and tearing.

    Ueshiba’s religion… call me skeptical. A close friend of mine was a true believer for years and couldn’t pull off joint locks when she was actually attacked. Thankfully, conventional beating worked.

    #35800

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